Category Archives: Education

Teachers – the vital ingredient in creating the UK’s next generation of engineers

Good article…but I still think the biggest problem is that we underpay our teachers relative to the current market.

http://www.infrastructure-intelligence.com/article/aug-2014/teachers-vital-ingredient-creating-uks-next-generation-engineers

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3 Ways Social Media Can Help You Land a Job (And Keep It)

What a great article.  And great to see a CEO wanting the technology he is involved in to actually help graduates.

Love this quote.

“My point is that as social media becomes incorporated more fully into business (and it will!) being savvy about Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn will become a critical skill set. In today’s business landscape, jobs are becoming less specialized and more general; the more you know, the more hireable you become.”

Suggests to me that new graduates when they apply for jobs, will more and more be judged on their own credentials. And they’ll have to show a genuine interest (and better still would be passion) in the job they are applying for.

http://blog.hootsuite.com/3-ways-get-a-job/

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In Head-Hunting, Big Data May Not Be Such a Big Deal

Shame about the title of the article, because it actually has a very revealing quote from Google.

Q. Other insights from the data you’ve gathered about Google employees?

A. One of the things we’ve seen from all our data crunching is that G.P.A.’s are worthless as a criteria for hiring, and test scores are worthless — no correlation at all except for brand-new college grads, where there’s a slight correlation. Google famously used to ask everyone for a transcript and G.P.A.’s and test scores, but we don’t anymore, unless you’re just a few years out of school. We found that they don’t predict anything.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/20/business/in-head-hunting-big-data-may-not-be-such-a-big-deal.html?_r=0

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Joining a software startup right out of school

This is a fantastic article. It should be mandatory reading for all IT Graduates globally. Infact even for High School (in the UK Secondary School) leavers.

I’d also like to add don’t let the fear of failure in startups deter you from considering them. The younger you are, the less likely you are to have family (ie kids) and financial (ie a mortgage & school fees) commitments which WILL more likely influence your decision making against startups.

You only live once so make it count and list all the options on the table, go through the pros and cons. And make a call, ideally talk it through with a friend or co-graduate.

http://chase-seibert.github.io/blog/2013/10/04/what-to-know-before-starting-at-a-startup.html

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StageLearn

Looks like a good resource, especially for home learners.  Frightening some of the stats on the US K-12 system.  Especially worrying that only 17% of engineer graduates are female.

Will be important that they keep the content of the case studies updated. I wish them the best of luck.

http://www.stagelearn.org/t1/History

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Careers guidance in schools not working well enough

Awesome. 4 in 5 uk state secondary schools supplying ineffective career advice and guidance to their students.

This report came out over a week ago but thats ok, the press are more concerned with Liz Hurley not wearing her engagement ring.

Definitely confirms to me that its up to us parents, to really help our children into their respective careers.  The earlier the better.

And one thing on the actual Ofsted report. This looks like to me its a one off report on 50 unsuspecting schools.  Why is career guidance not a regularly tested metric when Ofsted test individual schools?

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Why Being Awesome At School Can Make You Terrible At Work

Last 2 paragraphs should be mandatory reading for all children.

“The question, then, is how to develop that differentiation.

With a breadth of experience: As Steve Jobs used to say, a lot of it comes through the things that you’ve lived through: the more varied the bag of experiences that you’re walking around the world with, the better you can relate to colleagues and customers–and those connections create value.

With a depth of understanding: Let’s go back to that media company example, since we can’t help but gaze at our own navels. If we recognize that our organization has a gaping need–like analytics now or social media two years ago–then we want to develop a competency in that systemic incompetency.

But since no one at the company knows how to do it and you can’t exactly go back to grad school while you’re working, you’ll need to get non-institutional. Luckily, you don’t need to go back to school; as Kio Stark might say, school doesn’t have a monopoly on learning. And the cultivated autodidact will find ways to get at that skill development–it’s all a part of cultivating unstoppability, every day.”